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the NDA, .



      the NDA, . , , , .
     " , , " - Amrut Shinde, Aundh. Katraj Khadakwasla. . . NDA, , , , . , , .
      , : "- , . , Khadakwasla Katraj . , . ".
      Nalavade , - . " . : - , " - .

     

      20 01 2017


     Strays kill thirsty deer
      The spotted deer had wandered into the NDA area in search of water, which suggests the forests are already running dry despite healthy rain; forest department to start filling water holes earlier now
      A spotted deer ventured on to the National Defence Academy (NDA) area out of thirst on Thursday, only to be chased and mauled to death by stray dogs a clear indicator that despite sufficient rain this year, anthropogenic pressures and other global warming factors have played spoilsport when it comes to retention of water in the forests. This year, animals have started wandering outside in search of water earlier than usual, which often results in untoward incidents such as this.
      We got a call early in the morning about the death and reached the spot immediately, calling a doctor for postmortem and other formalities. There were around four to five dogs that kept tugging at the half-eaten carcass till we reached, shared Neelam Chavan, a forest guard who was present at the spot.
      The spotted deer was said to have been attacked by strays and not wild dogs, according to the department. The deer is a male aged around six years. The reason for death is visceral damage and internal haemorrhage, since the dogs have eaten most part of the deers stomach, said Dr Amrut Shinde, a veterinary doctor from the governments Aundh polyclinic.
      This is not the only such instance wildlife seems to be wandering out in other areas near Katraj and Khadakwasla as well in search of water. The forest department, which generally needs to fill up water holes around the end of February or early March, will have to start doing so earlier this year. In fact, in the wake of such incidents, they are also going to start making new water holes.
      When Mirror visited the forests around the NDA area, there were multiple water holes among which two were quite big. However, only one big water hole had enough water. The others, including all the smaller ones dotting the forest had totally dried out. Moreover, there seemed to be no natural stream or water body in the vicinity, which the animals could use as a means to quench their thirst.
      Mahesh Bhavsar, assistant conservator of forests in the Pune forest division, explained, The water holes have started drying up this year. This has forced the animals to come out of the forests in search of water. The idea is to keep them inside the forests itself. Besides this area, they are also seen to wander at Khadakwasla and Katraj areas near lakes and dams that have a good amount of water. When out, they are often chased by dogs and, considering the muck around the water, they are unable to escape quickly and fall prey to attacks. We are soon going to start making additional water holes in the forest areas itself, so that these things do not happen.
      However, Dr Sanjeev Nalavade, a citybased environmentalist who has conducted various surveys to document the wildlife in Pune, stated that the spotted deer is not the only species under threat. Those areas are also home to other animals like rabbits and mouse deer. These had been spotted earlier, but might still be there since the forests are kept pretty well. Four-horned antelopes and barking deer are also found in the area, apart from hyenas, he said.











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